General practice / scheduling

Crab

Can I schedule a visit before my child is born?

We welcome prenatal visits as they are a great opportunity for you to meet our doctors, tour the office and meet our wonderful staff and for our doctors to meet you. If you want to schedule the first appointment for your newborn, call us the day of your discharge from the hospital and we will schedule the appropriate early post-discharge appointment.

Can a 16-year old come in to be seen by herself?

Yes: but it is a good idea for a parent to call ahead with any specific concerns and to give consent for possible immunizations. You will also need to complete a consent form that allows us to see your child without a parent or guardian present. Please complete the following form and have your child bring it in to their appointment: http://heightspediatrics.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/04/finacial-policy-consent-to-treat-new.pdf

Do I need to have my child checked for illness before I travel?

Generally, no. You may wish to consult with your doctor if your child has a chronic medical condition, such as asthma, or if you are traveling overseas to a country with specific health issues. Certain non-routine immunizations may be indicated. You can check www.cdc.gov/travel for any special recommendation.

Do you take walk-in appointments?

No, we expect all patients with an illness to call first. Patients are usually seen the same day for illnesses, if appropriate.

How long must I wait for an appointment for a sick child?

We usually see all children the same day, or the next day if appropriate.

What age children does your practice see?

Our practice welcomes children from newborn through the college years. We have reserved an hour a week where we only see adolescent patients so that they don’t feel that they are seeing the “baby doctor”. For patients over 18 years you need to check with your insurance company to see if they will allow you to see a pediatrician.

Do you see patients who are not immunized?

Our practice strongly believes in immunizations. We are flexible in cases where parents want to follow a modified schedule. However, that schedule should be discussed with one of the doctors before a new patient joins the practice.

Do you have any late hours?

We are open Monday-Thursday until 6:15 p.m. and on Fridays we are open until 5:15 p.m.

What do I need to do to get a referral?

Generally a child should be seen before a referral, so that an appropriate evaluation can be performed, and therefore referral to the appropriate specialist.

Where can I park?

There are a lot of metered spots nearby and the closest parking lot is on Henry Street between Clark and Pineapple Streets (Cadman Towers) as well as on Clinton Street off the corner of Pierrepont Street.

Will my child always see our personal physician?

We are currently a practice of 2 physicians, so all patients should get to know the both of us. Many of our patients have personal preferences for check-ups, and we try to accommodate those wishes. For sick visits you will see whichever doctor has the earliest availability.

Will the doctor call in an antibiotic prescription for my child without being seen?

No. All patients need to be seen for any newly occurring illnesses. If you need a refill on medications that your child chronically uses, you can call the office during business hours or send us an email and we will call the refill to the pharmacy for you.

Do I need to bring my child in if she has a cold?

Colds and upper respiratory infections are usually caused by viruses. They typically last between 7 to 10 days and often are accompanied by fever initially. The temperature usually ranges anywhere from 100.4 to 102 F. The child should be brought to the office if there is any difficulty breathing, significant sore throat, ear ache, high fever (>102) or when the fever lasts more than 2 to 3 days, the fever appears at the end of a cold, or if the child appears physically ill.

Should my child get a flu shot?

Yes, influenza can be a serious illness and therefore it is recommended that all children 6 months of age and older receive yearly flu vaccines. This is especially important for children with any history of chronic medical conditions, such as wheezing or asthma.